Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust v Haywood [2018] UKSC – what are the implications of the Supreme Court’s judgment?

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Nathaniel Caiden considers today’s Supreme Court judgment in Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust v Haywood [2018] UKSC  in which Caspar Glyn QC and Tom Brown successfully represented Mrs Haywood. Today’s Supreme Court judgment has identified a standardised implied term when giving written notice of dismissal (i.e., a term implie...
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The death of holiday pay has been greatly exaggerated, but has the King slain Bear Scotland?

Caspar Glyn QC considers the decision of C‑214/16 King v The Sash Windows Workshop Limited which was handed down today. Summary The Court of Justice of the European Union has been saying, in its judgments over the past 11 years again and again and, yes, again that the right to paid holiday is a central European right that can’t be interpreted restr...
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Four leading Cloisters silks will be speaking at the renowned 22 QCs conference

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Four leading Cloisters silks talk on a wide range of hot topics at the renowned 22 QCs conference on the key employment law issues for 2017-18. The conference will take place on 5th and 6th October 2017 at Strand Palace Hotel, Central London. This two day conference promises to be the event of the year for anyone advising on employment or disc...
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The Supreme Court, ET fees and access to justice: Stopping the government in its tracks

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Caspar Glyn QC , Schona Jolly QC and Sian McKinley consider the implications of today’s seismic decision from the Supreme Court which ruled that ET fees are unlawful: R (on the application of UNISON) v Lord Chancellor [2017] UKSC 51.   Judgment Lord Reed, delivering the lead judgment, held the Employment Tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tri...
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Sleep-in workers revisited: a multi-factorial approach to eligibility for the minimum wage

Sleep-in workers revisited: a multi-factorial approach to eligibility for the minimum wage
Anna Beale considers the most recent guidance from the EAT on the vexed question of whether workers should receive the minimum wage for “sleep in” shifts. Keen readers of this site may recall my critical blog on the EAT decision in Shannon v Rampersad . In that case, HHJ Peter Clark decided that an ‘on call night care assistant’ in a residential ho...
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