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Embedded communications and protected disclosures: the law following Barton v Royal Borough of Greenwich By Rajiv Bhatt In the recent case of Barton v Royal Borough of Greenwich UKEAT/0041/14/DXA (in which the respondent was represented by Cloisters’ barrister Sheryn Omeri) the claimant came to find out that his line manager had emailed documents which contained personal data to what he thought was her unsecured home email address.  He considered this to be a significant breach of the Data Protection Act 1998 (“DPA 1998”), and so contacted the Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) and thereafter his line managers.   The respondent instructed him not to contact the ICO again without the prior authorisation of his line manager,

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Jonathan Mitchell QC joins Cloisters as associate member We are delighted to announce that Jonathan Mitchell QC has joined Cloisters as an associate tenant.  Jonathan, a member of the Scottish Bar, brings with him his great skill and experience in commercial law,  discrimination and equality, employment, sports and entertainment, human rights, regulatory and public law. He is renowned for his strength in appellate matters and high-profile cases. "He is a class act, with a very wide range... an elegant, concise and forceful advocate...” with a “fierce intellect" Chambers and Partners 2015. Jonathan, whose wide civil practice is based in Scotland,  has appeared 14 times in the House of Lords/UK

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Gay police officer PC Dan Lichters wins discrimination claim against the Metropolitan Police The Metropolitan Police has again lost a major discrimination claim brought against it by a serving officer. Akua Reindorf represented PC Lichters in his claim for direct sexual orientation discrimination, harassment and victimisation. The Met's beleaguered Fairness at Work (FAW) grievance procedure was also criticised for failing to provide any mechanism by which a discrimination complaint can be upheld. The Employment Tribunal found that PC Lichters was discriminated against over a period of six years, from the beginning of his appointment to the elite Dog Support Unit. He was subjected to disparaging and discriminatory comments directly connected to his sexual orientation

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A victory for gay rights as Ashers bakery is found liable for discrimination By Olivia Dobbie In a judgment handed down today by a County Court sitting in Belfast, Ashers bakery was found liable for discriminating against a customer when it refused to fulfil his order of making a cake which was iced with the slogan “Support Gay Marriage”. Cloisters’ Robin Allen QC acted for the customer (the plaintiff) in this significant ruling which will have wide-reaching implications. The facts The customer, Mr Lee, is a gay man and is involved with a volunteer organisation called QueerSpace, supporting LGBT rights in Northern Ireland. He has a genuine and deeply-held belief that gay people should

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Radio 4 Unreliable Evidence: Clive Anderson asks Sarah Fraser Butlin what law can do for the gender pay gap In “Unreliable Evidence”, broadcasted on BBC Radio 4 on 13 May 2015, Clive Anderson and a panel of senior legal experts discussed the apparent failure of the Equal Pay Act 1970 to bridge the gender pay gap.  Amongst those taking part was Cloisters barrister,Vice Chair of the Industrial Law Society and Cambridge academic Sarah Fraser Butlin who told the programme that court actions have replaced trade union collective bargaining as a force for social change in this area, but believes that this is an extremely inefficient way to correct pay inequality.  For a link to the programme via the BBC website,

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Schona Jolly shortlisted for  'Barrister of the Year' at the Lawyer Award 2015 Chambers is delighted to congratulate Schona Jolly on being shortlisted for 'Barrister of the Year' at The Lawyers Award 2015. Schona is head of Cloisters' Civil Liberties and Human Rights Group and on the Bar's Human Rights Committee. The shortlist for The Lawyer Awards 2015 was announced today. The winner will be announced at an awards ceremony on Tuesday 23 June at the Grosvenor House Hotel in London.  For further information about the awards and the full list of those shortlisted please click here. 

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Caspar Glyn QC and Tom Brown succeed in appeal for University College Union: collective consultation duty applies to fixed-term employees University and College Union v University of Stirling When are proposed dismissals for reasons not related to the individuals concerned? This is the question that employers, trade unions and Employment Tribunals must address when considering whether an employer is obliged to consult about collective redundancies, because it is only when a dismissal is for reasons unrelated to the individual concerned that the duty to consult arises.  The Supreme Court endorsed the ‘admirable test’ stated by the Employment Appeal Tribunal in University and College Union v University of Stirling: ‘A reason relates to the individual if it is something to do with

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Cloisters responds to public consultation by the European Commission on its review of the Working Time Directive A team of four Cloisters’ barristers, Claire McCann, Olivia Dobbie, Sian McKinley and Chesca Lord, have co-written a response to the public consultation by the European Commission in connection with its review of the Working Time Directive.  The consultation was announced in December 2014 and concluded on 18 March 2015.  Here is a link to the response document.  It is hoped that the Commission’s review will address the impact of recognised changes to working partners since the first Working Time Directive was implemented more than 20 years ago.  Fundamental changes to the economy, technology and working patterns have impacted greatly on the

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Cloisters unites with key family rights groups to raise awareness on shared parental leave and pay by Claire McCann Cloisters has joined Your Employment Settlement Service(YESS) Law, Maternity Action and Working Families to produce and disseminate vital information on the complex rights associated with shared parental leave which may be taken in respect of babies due to be born on or after 5 April 2015.  The shared parental leave regime is complicated and tricky to understand.  The alliance of Cloisters with these key family rights organisations is called SPLash and we will be producing factsheets and blogs to help increase awareness and understanding for parents and employers on shared parental leave and pay.  The first blog, “Shared

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William Latimer-Sayer appears for successful Claimant in record medical negligence award case Cloisters barrister, William Latimer-Sayer, led by Susan Rodway QC, appeared for the successful Claimant in a case that saw the highest ever medical clinical negligence award in history. The High Court ruled today that United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust must pay £14.6 million for birth injuries to James Robshaw, after failing to carry out a Caesarean section on his mother Suzanne Adams and properly monitoring her during labour. Her son James suffered catastrophic injuries as a result of obstetric negligence. Liability was admitted. Instructing solicitor: Denise Stephens at Shoosmiths. For judgment read: James Robshaw (a child by his mother and litigation friend

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Court reserves judgment in gay rights v religious beliefs case Gareth Lee v Ashers Baking Company Limited Belfast High Court reserved judgment yesterday in the case of Gareth Lee v Ashers Baking Company Ltd - a case that could have wide-reaching consequences for shop owners. Robin Allen QC, acting for gay rights activist Gareth Lee, told the court why a business should not “be allowed to break a contract with a single individual over small sums of money in a way that is tortious and in breach of equality law” irrespective of the fact that the business owner was acting on his or her religious beliefs, the Guardian reports. Mr Lee,

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Three Cloisters’ barristers elected on Industrial Law Society’s executive committee Chambers is delighted to congratulate Sarah Fraser Butlin who was elected  Vice Chair of the Industrial Law Society at its recent elections. She is joined by Anna Beale who is the newly elected Secretary and Declan O’Dempsey on the executive  committee. Sarah Fraser Butlin is  and employment specialist ‘noted for her strength at appellate level, and is recognised for her strong grasp of the technical minutiae in a case. She is very bright, client-friendly and excellent at cross-examination." (Chambers and Partners). Anna Beale is an employment specialist employment specialist, "well respected for her work on cutting-edge discrimination cases", who also maintains

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Daphne Romney QC acts for 3000 women in successful equal pay claim against council Daphne Romney QC, instructed by Fox & Partners, represented 3000 Claimants, including carers, cooks, cleaners, school crossing patrollers, sheltered housing wardens and caretakers working for North Lanarkshire Council. They were claiming equal pay with male comparators following a job evaluation scheme brought into effect in November 2006. The comparators included refuse collectors, refuse drivers, street sweepers and gardeners. The case was adjourned part heard in January for negotiations. Yesterday (19 March 2015), the Council approved a settlement agreement reached  between the Fox Claimants, the Unison Claimants and the Council. This means that settlement offers will sent out to the Claimants by

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Tribunal finds compulsory retirement of cricket umpires at 65 was not age discrimination By David Massarella On 13 March 2015 the London Central Employment Tribunal gave judgment in a test case about the right of the England and Wales Cricket Board (‘EWCB’) to dismiss first class umpires (‘FCUs’) at 65.  In Willey and Sharpe v England and Wales Cricket Board it rejected the idea that the EWCB could rely on its stated aim of avoiding disputes about potentially failing capability and so ‘preserving the dignity’ of the umpires, but found that their dismissals were not unlawful age discrimination because they were a justified means of pursuing the aims of bringing on new talent and

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Henderson v GMB : Discrimination and philosophical belief By Jennifer Danvers The recent EAT judgment in Henderson v GMB   is a must-read for practitioners seeking to advance or respond to claims of discrimination on the grounds of philosophical belief.          The Facts Keith Henderson, a GMB Regional organiser was dismissed on 7 December 2012.  At first instance the Tribunal held that Mr Henderson had been fairly dismissed for gross misconduct (being unmanageable and making unsupported allegations of collusion between the GMB and the Labour party), but that he had suffered direct discrimination and harassment on the basis of his “left-wing democratic socialist beliefs” for which he

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Spinal orthopaedic specialist found negligent in failure to diagnose child with scoliosis Spinal orthopaedic specialist found negligent in failure to diagnose child with scoliosis Simon Dyer Cloisters  clinical negligence and personal injury barrister acted for the successful claimant in Tresidder v Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust (Queens Bench Division)11 March 2015 where an eminent spinal orthopaedic surgeon was found to have negligently decided that an eight-year-old boy did not have scoliosis, despite the independent opinions of two GPs and the raised concerns of the boy's mother. On the balance of probabilities it was found that the boy did have scoliosis that was just within the visible range at the time. The court was required to

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Terri Paddock wins unfair dismissal claim against WhatsOnStage If WhatsOnStage recommended you a play about a woman sacked for sexual harassment of another woman at the Office Christmas Lunch, even though the alleged victim had never made a complaint, you might have thought it sounded too far-fetched. Sadly for Terri Paddock, its well-known Managing Director, it was all too true. Two days after the lunch Ms Paddock, who had been having difficulties with the US company which owned WhatsOnStage, was called in to see the CEO, Gretchen Shugart and the CFO Joe Yurcik (at which they both been present) and was accused of touching a colleague’s breast for 30

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Seven members appointed to the Equality & Human Rights Commission Panel of Preferred Counsel All Cloisters' employment specialists are experts in the area of  Equality Law, so we are delighted to announce that seven of its members have been appointed to the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) new Panel of Preferred Counsel.  They are: Robin Allen QC; Paul Epstein QC ; Declan O’Dempsey; Catherine Casserley; Schona Jolly; David Massarella and Chris Milsom The Panel of Counsel comprises of barristers (in England & Wales) and advocates (in Scotland) who support the EHRC on all legal issues arising out of its functions and activities, including issues that challenge areas of equality and human rights law. Parliament gave the Commission the mandate to challenge discrimination,

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CA delivers much needed guidance on granting anonymity at approval hearings JX MX v Dartford  Gravesham NHS Trust [2015] EWCA Civ 96 In a landmark judgment handed down today the Court of Appeal have given guidance concerning the request for anonymity at approval hearings. Approval hearings are required under Part 21 of the Civil Procedure Rules when cases are settled on behalf of children and adults who lack capacity.  Such hearings are not required by adults who settle their claims.  The concern had been that since approval hearings are public hearings at which details of the claimant’s injuries and settlement are made known that confidential information would fall into the public domain

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Sheryn Omeri awarded a Pegasus Scholarship to work at the International Criminal Court Cloisters is delighted to announce that Sheryn Omeri  has been awarded a Pegasus Scholarship to work in the Prosecutor’s office at the International Criminal Court.  Sheryn will start on 13 April and finish on 10 July 2015 when she will be back at Chambers.

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Whistle-blower doctor challenges MOD over sacking by text Cloisters' barrister Schona Jolly appears for whistle-blower, Dr Stephen Frost, who was fired by text after requesting a police investigation into the dispensing of morphine sulphate tablets at an army base near Blackpool. Dr Frost, who has been granted leave to challenge the MOD at the Employment Tribunal, claims he was not told why his contract was terminated, was not given the opportunity to defend himself and has since suffered stress, anxiety and depression as the result. The full hearing is due to be heard in the summer. Dr Frost was a campaigner for an inquiry into the death of UN

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When is a religious or political belief appropriate? Employment Appeal Tribunal to consider when a manifestation of a religious or political belief is appropriate   Cloister’s barristers, Ed Williams and Sarah Fraser Butlin, are instructed in the case of GMB v Henderson which will be of fundamental importance to all discrimination lawyers. Keith Henderson was employed as a regional organiser in the General Municipal Boilermakers Union’s (GMB) London region. His job involved undertaking political work as part of the region's political efforts on behalf of the Labour party. Mr Henderson was dismissed for gross misconduct following a series of incidents. His appeal is against a finding that he was

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Retirement of Cricketing Umpires Cloisters barrister Declan O’Dempsey represented Peter Willey and George Sharp against the English Cricket Board at Central London Employment Tribunal this week. The umpires brought cases, backed by Prospect union, for unfair dismissal and age discrimination when they were forced to retire by the ECB because they were reaching 65.  The ECB said that they need the rule for “succession planning” and to avoid undignified disputes about capability and performance.  However the umpires argue that a retirement age of 65 is unnecessary for either purpose because there is no evidence that umpires’ capabilities decline with age in any relevant way and

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Successful appeal against dismissal automatically revives contract of employment

Cloisters’ barrister Nathaniel Caiden appeared for the successful appellant in Salmon v Castlebeck Care (Teesdale) Ltd and Ors, an important judgment from the Employment Appeal Tribunal about the effect of a successful appeal on an employee’s contract of employment.

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William Latimer Sayer and Catriona Stirling appear in injury case where High Court awards record damages to English national

Judgment has today been handed down by the High Court in the case of Totham v King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, following a December 2014 trial.

Cloisters barristers, William Latimer-Sayer and Catriona Stirling represented the successful claimant, a seven year old girl from south London, who suffered serious injuries during her birth at King’s College Hospital in 2007.

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Rachel Crasnow appointed Chair of the Police Appeals Tribunal Chambers is delighted to congratulate Rachel Crasnow on her appointment as Chair of the Police Appeals Tribunal which took effect on 19 December 2014. Rachel remains in full-time practice at Chambers and this new part-time role augments her long-standing work in the regulatory sphere, including her recent appointment as Legal Advisor to the United Kingdom Board for Health Care Chaplaincy (UKBHC).  

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Supreme Court to consider scope of 'collective redundancies' Cloisters' barristers, Caspar Glyn QC and Tom Brown , are acting for the University and College Union in an appeal to be heard by the Supreme Court on Wednesday 21 January 2015. Brian Napier QC, also of Cloisters, appears for the Respondent. The case - University and College Union v University of Stirling (Case ID: UKSC 2014/0067) - will consider the scope of the obligation on employers to consult employees in collective redundancy situations. It will be the first time that the Supreme Court has considered the definition of redundancy in the context of the statutory obligation to consult about collective

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Cloisters' barristers Sheryn Omeri and Rachel Barrett secure substantial damages for rape victim Cloisters' barristers Sheryn Omeri and Rachel Barrett, secured substantial damages for a victim of crime they represented in an appeal to the First Tier Tribunal Criminal Injuries Compensation this month. Sheryn and Rachel were instructed by the Bar Pro Bono Unit. The successful appeal was against an initial award of £11,000 offered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority. Cloisters is a 'Friend in Law' of the Bar Pro Bono Unit which matches barristers who undertake pro bono work for members of society who need their help and cannot afford to pay for the legal assistance sought ,or obtain public funding, or

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Cloisters' barrister Rachel Crasnow appointed Silk Chambers is delighted to announce that Rachel Crasnow has been appointed Queen’s Counsel. This appointment recognises her long-held reputation as an outstanding employment and discrimination expert and advocate. As a junior Rachel featured in some of the most high-profile and complex litigation in her fields and joins Cloisters’ team of now nine leading silks in employment and discrimination law. Cloisters and Rachel thank all the clients who have supported her and enabled her to develop her practice over the years.  Rachel’s swearing in ceremony will take place on 16th February 2015. Please contact Senior Clerk, Glenn Hudson, for further information.

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Chemical weapons and the ICC Can the International Criminal Court (ICC) start prosecuting for the use and supply of chemical weapons? Cloisters barrister Sheryn Omeri considers the ICC’s options in an article featured in Counsel Jan 2015. For the full article read:Chemical Weapons and the ICC by Sheryn Omeri

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UN reopens inquiry into Secretary General's death following Hammarskjöld Commission’s recommendation The United Nations is to reopen an investigation into the death of UN Secretary General following recommendations made by a commission chaired by Cloisters’ Sir Stephen Sedley. Dag Hammarskjöld was on a mission in 1961 aimed at brokering a ceasefire between the Congolese government and rebels when his plane crashed in Zambia. The 1962 UN investigation that followed failed to identify the cause of the crash instead reaching an open verdict. However, the Hammarskjöld Commission, a voluntary body of four international and distinguished jurists set up in 2012 to report on the findings, called for a fresh inquiry. It reported that the US National Security

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Cloisters’ Robin Allen QC heads IRLR’s all-time top advocates list Cloisters’ Head of Chambers, Robin Allen QC, is listed as the clear leader in argued cases reported in the Industrial Relations Law Reports’ with 145 appearances reported in IRLR from its inception in 1972 to 2014 as recorded in Equal Opportunities review January 2015. Cloisters members who are also listed for appearing over 10 times as advocates in IRLR since 1972 include: Sir Stephen Sedley, Jason Galbraith-Marten QC,  Andrew Buchan , Rachel Crasnow, Philip Engelman, Paul Epstein QC, Declan O’Dempsey and Adam Ohringer. Out of the 186 barristers listed, Rachel Crasnow is one of only 33 women entered. Adam Ohringer is one of

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First case in EAT to consider caste-based discrimination

The EAT has today handed down judgment in the case of Chandhok v Tirkey.

This the first case in the EAT to consider caste-based discrimination. A link to the judgment can be found here. and a link to our previous post summarising the arguments in the appeal can be found here.

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Obesity can be considered a disability: EU court rules

By Claire McCann

The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has handed down a key judgment today on the vexed question of whether obesity constitutes a disability within the meaning of EU law.

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Staff to be charged with gross negligence manslaughter over child’s death

Cloisters barrister, Linda Jacobs represented the family at the inquest of a six year old boy Jack Adcock who was admitted to Leicester Royal Infirmary with sickness and diarrhoea, and was later diagnosed as suffering pneumonia and septic shock.

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Cloisters barrister Caspar Glyn QC comments on  proposed law relating to exploited migrant workers

Caspar Glyn QC, Cloisters' barrister,  comments to BBC World at One and the BBC on proposed new criminal offences in relation to exploited migrant workers.

For BBC coverage on this go to: BBC news

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Bus company wins appeal over wheelchair policy

by Olivia Dobbie

In the Court of Appeal judgment handed down today in the case of Firstgroup v Paulley, it was held that although wheelchair users have priority to occupy designated wheelchair spaces on buses, there is no legal requirement for bus drivers to move passengers from that space to allow wheelchair users to board. The Court of Appeal held that passengers should “of course” move from the designated space to allow wheelchair users to use it, but that if such passengers refuse, the driver is not required to do anything more than ask them to move. If they continue to refuse, the wheelchair user will have to wait for the next bus.

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Is caste discrimination barred under the Equality Act?

The Employment Appeal Tribunal has reserved its decision in the case of Chandhok v Tirkey concerning whether caste-based discrimination is prohibited under the Equality Act 2010.

Christopher Milsom, who appeared at first instance, led Tamar Burton in the first case heard by the EAT concerning caste-based discrimination. The Equality and Human Rights Commission was granted permission to intervene.

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Why UK whistle-blowing protection laws don’t always apply to those who blow the whistle overseas

Smania v Standard Chartered

This EAT case concerns the territorial scope of whistle-blowing involving a Claimant a banker working in Singapore for the Respondent.

The Claimant sought to argue that UK whistle-blowing protection applied to him when he made allegations of financial misconduct. The Respondent’s registered office is based in the UK and is regulated by both UK law along and relevant Asian regulation.

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Whistleblowing - time starts to run as soon as decision/act occurs, says EAT Does time start to run (under s48(3)) when the employer makes a decision, or when the employee is told of it, in a whistleblowing claim (not dismissal)? McKinney v London Borough of Newham (UKEAT/0501/13/LA) (EAT) by Sally Cowen Cloisters Chambers' barrister Declan O’Dempsey represented the Claimant in this appeal under the pro bono Employment Law Appeal Advice Scheme (ELAAS). The EAT held that it was when the employer makes the decision. C worked for R in the finance department. His first claim alleged detriment short of dismissal as a result of a protected disclosure. He also subsequently claimed constructive dismissal. The

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Stem cell freezing may have contributed to death – coroner rules The coroner at the inquest of 12 year old cancer patient, Sophie Ryan-Palmer, who died in 2013 after frozen cells were used in a bone marrow transplant at Great Ormond Street Hospital, ruled that freezing stem cells may have contributed to her death. Three other children also died that year. All were treated at the hospital at the same time but died at different times due to their differing illnesses. Sarah Fraser Butlin acted for the family of one of the children, 13-month old Ryan Loughran. In Ryan’s case the treatment would not have affected the outcome. For the full story

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Advocate General rejects UK challenge to EU legislation capping bankers’ bonuses By Anna Beale In an Opinion delivered today,[1] Advocate General Jääskinen has rejected the UK’s challenge to the provisions in the EU’s “Capital Requirements” legislation (comprising Directive 2013/36/EU and Regulation (EU) No 575/2013) which purport to regulate the amount of bankers’ bonuses and promote greater transparency in relation to remuneration packages. Directive 2013/36/EU includes a provision imposing a set ratio between fixed remuneration (basic salary), and variable remuneration (bonus) for individuals whose professional activities impact on the risk profile of financial institutions. Such individuals may not be paid a bonus exceeding 100% of their basic salary, which can be increased to

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The migrant domestic worker who suffered mistreatment and victimisation by her employers has been granted leave to appeal to the Supreme Court. Cloisters’ barristers Robin Allen QC  Head of Chambers and Christopher Milsom will represent the Appellant in this leading case. For background news on case development go to Cloisters news: Taiwo v Olaigbe & Anr  For CA decision: Onu v Akwiwu & Anor: Taiwo v Olaigbe & Anor [2014] EWCA Civ 279

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Robin Allen QC, Cloisters head of Chambers and a leading expert in equality law was asked for his expert opinion on BBC London ‘Inside Out ‘ investigation footage that showed a large number of  high street chains still seen to be failing to accommodate people with disabilities. Two BBC researchers, one blind with a guide dog and one wheelchair bound, documented their experience with pinhole cameras. Some of the top chains were seen to fail to provide ramps for the wheelchair and five mini cabs were seen to refuse to take the guide-dog. After viewing the footage, Mr Allen said: “What

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The remedies hearing on the second wave of the pay case representing 363 claims dating from 2001 to 2007 against North Lanarkshire Council, raised examples of women working in the social care service being paid less than men doing the same job. The two day hearing took place in Glasgow. Ms Daphne Romney representing the claimants argued strongly for the appropriate statutory rate of interest applicable in Scotland and an award for Injury to feelings (ITF).   The Council argued for a lower rate of interest to be applied to awards and that ITF does not apply to equal pay cases. Employment

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Cloisters’ barrister Hannah Godfrey represents mother in tummy tuck operation case To read press coverage on the case go to: http://www.kentonline.co.uk/sandwich/news/scar-like-curtains-claim-in-tummy-tuck-ordeal-26558/ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-29904521 http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/11/05/tummy-tuck-sue-cosmetic-surgeon_n_6105736.html http://www.canterburytimes.co.uk/Canterbury-doctor-sued-tummy-tuck-operation-gone/story-24185011-detail/story.html

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Cloisters' barristers Caspar Glyn QC and Olivia Faith-Dobbie appeared on Sky News and BBC News yesterday to discuss the implications of the Employment Appeal Tribunal holiday pay judgment. For more information on the case and its impact please read "Holiday pay – the great miscalculation" and "Holiday Pay Judgment: What it means for you".          

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by Olivia-Faith Dobbie On 4 November 2014, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) handed down its decision in Bear Scotland Ltd v Fulton and Baxter, Hertel (UK) Ltd v Wood and others and Amec Group Limited v Law and others. It is a ground-breaking decision which gives some clarity to various European Judgments on the issue. The key points to take from the decision are that: Holiday pay should be equivalent to a worker’s “normal” pay. What is “normal” depends on whether the payment in question has been made for a sufficient period of time to justify the label of being “normal”

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The Employment Appeal Tribunal (the Honourable Mr Justice Langstaff) has today handed down judgment in the conjoined appeals of Bear Scotland Limited v 1) Mr David Fulton 2) Mr Douglas Baxter (EATS/0047/13/BI); Hertel (UK) Limited -v- Mr K Wood & Others (EAT/0160/14/SM); Amec Group Limited -v- Law & Others (EAT/0161/14/SM). The full judgment can be found here Brian Napier QC of Cloisters acted as counsel for the Appellant, Bear Scotland Limited, and further comment/analysis will soon be found in our blog.

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Cloisters barristers are instructed in relation to 15 out of the 63 Key employment and discrimination law cases for 2014-2015 identified by Mickey Rubenstein in his annual talk for the Industrial Law Society last night, demonstrating the wide-ranging expertise of Cloisters’ Employment & Equality Law Team.  The List of Key Cases will shortly be published in the Equal Opportunities Review, here

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